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European projects

ECSTATIC

Electrostructural Tomography – Towards Multiparametric Imaging of Cardiac Electrical Disorders 

 

The aim of the ERC project is to advance knowledge about the characterisation of cardiac electrical disorders and so create new tools for diagnosis and treatment by developing a new non-invasive method (electrostructural tomography), combining magnetic resonance and non-invasive cardiac mapping.

 

The project received funding from the “European Research Council” as part of the ‘Horizon 2020’ programme: EU research and innovation programme from 2014 to 2020:  ERC-2016-STG, (Research Agreement No. 715093).

PUSHCART

Personalized MultiSystems simulations for Honing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

 

This project will combine the electrical, mechanical and haemodynamic function in the most detailed, multiphysics and multiscale representation of the heart to date.

Validation of experimental, retrospective and prospective studies will help us to develop a predictive tool to determine optimal CRT lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

 

This project received funding from ERA-Net ERACoSysMed, “collaboration on systems medicine funding to promote the implementation of systems biology approaches in clinical research and medical practice" (Agreement No. ANR-15-CMED-0003-01)

 
CORDIS3D

CORDIS 3D Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme

 

CORDIS3D is an exchange partnership bringing together four leading centres with unique and complementary expertise in order to systematically study the structural substrate of propagation and arrhythmia in the normal and failing heart and in heart failure. Arrhythmias studied will be the role of Purkinje Fibres in ventricular fibrillation, pulmonary venous cuff re-entry in atrial fibrillation, the role of structural changes in myocardial infarction in ventricular fibrillation and right ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia. Tissue studied will include hearts from relevant animal disease models, post-mortem/operative human tissues. Disease models studied will include experimental models of infarction and right heart failure. Structural imaging will be accompanied by 3D-electrophysiological recording and computational modelling to enable investigation of the structure function relationship.

 

"The research leading to these results received funding from the European Union - Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme."

SYMPHONY

Sudden Cardiac Death and Electrical Dyssynchrony Mediated by Purkinje-His Dysfunctional Activity

 

The main objectives of SYMPHONY are (i) to advance our fundamental understanding in the mechanisms underlying sudden cardiac deaths and electrical dyssynchrony in heart failure, with a strong focus on the specialized ventricular conduction network and (ii) to improve current preventive, diagnostic and treatment methods for these life-threatening cardiac electrical disorders.

 

SYMPHONY is an inherently multi-disciplinary project that will benefit from a wide array of state-of-the-art methodologies and expertise available in our institute, both in fundamental and clinical sciences.

 

Les recherches menant aux présents résultats ont bénéficié du financement de "European Research Council" dans le cadre de  "European Union's Seventh Framework Programme" (FP / 2007-2013) / ERC Grant Accord n. ERC-2012-ADG 20120314 '.

PIC (MSCA ITN)

  Personalised in silico cardiology

 

Advances in computer and simulation technology nowadays allow us to analyse unpublished clinical data in silico (via computer models), to visualise the early detection of conditions using model-based diagnostic biomarkers and to design personalised therapies using predictive models. The in-silico tools also reduce the use of animals in developing new cardiac therapies and medication.

PIC is a European, MSCA-ITN type project, which will train the cohort of 15 future leaders of innovation, capable of formulating and achieving the vision of Personalised In-silico Cardiology (PIC).

IHU Liryc is a partner in this European project co-ordinated by King's College London

Research projects